What Saddam Hussein Looked for in Job Candidates

The May/June 2006 issue of the centrist Foreign Affairs will offer an inside look at Saddam Hussein’s management style, based on documents captured from him.
 
Regarding his hiring practices:
 
Saddam truly trusted only person: himself. As a result, he concentrated more and more power in his own hands.
 
No single man could do everything, however; forced to enlist the help of others to handle operational details, Saddam used a remarkable set of hiring criteria.
 
As one senior Iraqi leader noted, Saddam selected the “uneducated, untalented, and those who posed no threat to his leadership for key roles.” Always wary of a potential coup, Saddam remained reluctant to entrust military authority to anyone too far removed from his family or tribe.

The Internet's Role in Decision-making

New study from the Pew Internet & American Life Project.

Using the Internet for Decision-Making

Percent of internet users who dealt with the issue

Percent of those who dealt with issue for which internet played crucial role

Percent of those who dealt with issue for which internet played important role

Number of Americans who said the internet was crucial or important

Gotten additional training for your career

39%

21%

18%

21 million

Helped another person with a major illness or medical condition

49

9

17

17

Chosen a school or college for yourself or your child

29

22

20

17

Bought a car

46

12

15

16

Made a major investment or financial decision

41

12

17

16

Found a new place to live

24

15

15

10

Changed jobs

25

13

12

8

Dealt yourself with a major illness or other health condition

19

5

23

7

 

 

The Latest Heather Hamilton

You may have heard of Heather Hamilton’s blog, aimed at drumming up interest in Microsoft careers with a tangent thrown in here and there (they were giving out samples of the coffee-and-Coke combo here in Los Angeles and I think it’s great) …
 
The newest employer blog: Allianz, an insurance company that is looking to fill actuarial jobs, auditing jobs, a chief HR executive, and more.

Some New Numbers


Zurich is the world?s No. 1 city when it comes to quality of living, according to Mercer Human Resource Consulting, whose criteria included political stability, economics, medicine, schools, recreation, climate, and more. Geneva was second, Vancouver third. (Baghdad is the lowest). Honolulu is the highest-ranking city in the United States, Houston the lowest.
 

–“Approximately 46 percent of CEOs anticipate an increase in employment levels in their industry, about the same as last year when 44 percent said they expected an increase,” according to the Conference Board. “But the proportion of CEOs who anticipate a decline in jobs over the next six months rose sharply to 24 percent, up from about 11 percent a year ago. Health care costs remain the major obstacle to hiring new workers. Regulation and litigation costs were second on the list, while other fringe benefits and wage and salary costs remain of lesser concern to business leaders when hiring new workers.”

 

“Tech-sector job cuts announced in the first quarter were 40 percent lower than the same quarter a year ago,” according to Challenger, Gray & Christmas. This was the fourth consecutive quarter in which tech cuts were below the year-ago level. 

 

?More than 77 percent of (mainly large companies) see dramatic increases in talent management initiatives within the organization over the next three years? said Jason Averbook, CEO of Knowledge Infusion.

 

$30,000 to $40,000 is the going rate for St. Louis technicians (and $80,000 to $100,000 for Ph.D. scientists), on the hunt for “the perfect pet food.”
 
–About $11 to $17 is the going rate for security professionals at the San Diego airport.